Category Archives: women’s history

Celebrating Wyoming Women: Women’s History Month

It’s finally March, when our thoughts tend to turn to spring, warmer temperatures, and the possibility of spending time outdoors.  Every year, March also brings us Women’s History Month, a celebration of women’s accomplishments and progress towards equal footing with … Continue reading

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The Governor and the Librarian! Nellie Tayloe Ross Faces Grace Raymond Hebard in the Ring!

Nellie Tayloe Ross Claim to Fame:  The first woman governor of Wyoming—but also, the first woman to be elected governor in the United States! Special Skills: Ladylike decorum, pioneering spirit, ability to compromise, communication skills Collection Connection: The Nellie Tayloe … Continue reading

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The Nellie Tayloe Ross Papers: Making History (And Teaching It, Too)!

Hi!  My name is Jessica Griess and I just finished my junior year as a history undergraduate student.  This past semester, I took an Archival Research Methods class at the American Heritage Center.  The class allowed my classmates and I … Continue reading

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Women Journalists: New Digital Images Available

As the result of a generous gift from Toni Stabile, we are pleased to announce that nearly 11,000 items (10,967, to be exact) from four different collections were digitized.  Ms. Stabile’s donation was directed towards scanning collections by women journalists … Continue reading

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Women’s History Month: The Girl Scouts of Wyoming

March is Women’s History Month and 2012 is the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America.   What better way to recognize Women’s History  month than by highlighting one of the organizations that strives to empower … Continue reading

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Black History Month Highlight: Elizabeth Byrd, Wyoming Politician

We continue our celebration of Black History Month by drawing much-deserved attention to Elizabeth Byrd.  She was another Wyoming “First,” in that she was the first African-American to serve in the Wyoming House of Representatives, as well as in the … Continue reading

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Woman’s Experience of Show Business Documented in June Knight Papers

Actress, singer and dancer June Knight was born Margaret Rose Vallikett, January 22, 1913 in Los Angeles, California. An only child to parents Holley and Beryl Vallikett, Margaret Rose turned an early handicap into a very successful career. Due to … Continue reading

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Papers of Mademoiselle Editor Processed

Betsy Talbot Blackwell (1905-1985) greatly influenced the way many young women’s magazines today are published. She began her career as an assistant fashion editor at Charm magazine in 1933, before becoming a fashion editor at Mademoiselle in 1935 with its … Continue reading

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Found in the Archives: Mormon Handcart Pioneers

Mid-19th Century Mormon handcart pioneers migrated from the midwest to Salt Lake City, pushing their belongings across the many miles in handcarts, an arduous and dangerous task. The Hugo G. Janssen Photographs (1918-1955) contain photographs of original hand-cart members from … Continue reading

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January Photo of the Month

It’s winter in the Rocky Mountains, and one of the best ways to beat the doldrums that come with the season is to get outside for some exercise!  Snowshoes make it possible to do just that!  The style of snowshoe pictured here … Continue reading

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