Urban Mountain Climbing

As you might already know, the Centennial Complex’s twenty-year-old roof is currently undergoing replacement; allegedly, the enormous amount of scaffolding required to encapsulate the building has created a scaffolding shortage in five nearby states.

Ever wonder what the view would look like from the top of the Cone on the Range, aka “The Centennial Complex?”  Last Monday, lucky Centennial Complex staff members had a special opportunity to scale the scaffolding surrounding the building with one of the project foremen and were able to take in the view from the very tip of the Centennial Complex.  No employees had ever been able to venture that high ever before, so it was quite the experience.

Now, kids, don’t try this at home!  Instead, sit back and take in the views shown here!

Onward and upward!

Onward and upward!

Staff members make their way up the ladder to stand on the scaffold surrounding the very top of the cone.

Staff members make their way up the ladder to stand on the scaffold surrounding the very top of the cone.

Archival processor Mary Ann Meyer shared these comments about the experience: “I am scared of heights but I didn’t want to wake up Tuesday and say to myself ‘Darn it, it wish I had gone to the top.’  Sooooo….I sucked it up and went.  Knees were knockin’ and shakin all over but I’m really glad I did it.”

Staff on Re-roofing Tour

What a view!

University archivist Laura Uglean-Jackson enjoyed the view from the top!  She was thrilled to have the chance to climb to the top of the cone, but commented on the frightening components of the experience, too.

I’ve worked here six years but have never been to the very top of the cone so it was really a once-in-a-great-while opportunity.  It was much scarier than I anticipated even though the scaffolding was solid (at least, until the very top).  I got kind of freaked out after I found myself on the top of the cone, after crossing a fairly large gap between the scaffolding and the roof, then climbing a ladder.  It was beautiful up there, though.  Although it was a fun adventure, I was glad to be back on solid ground.   Not sure how the construction workers do it day in and day out- they must have nerves of steel.

Getting down is sometimes harder than climbing up! - watch out for that vertigo!

Getting down is sometimes harder than climbing up! – watch out for that vertigo!

The Centennial Complex staff members marvel at the height they've just climbed and then descended.  Whew!

The Centennial Complex staff members marvel at the height they’ve just climbed and then descended. Whew!

–Photos by Rick Walters

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One Response to Urban Mountain Climbing

  1. Louise Jackson says:

    What a view! Thanks for sharing!

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